How Home Kitchens are Changing in 2020

by Chuck Roper 10. February 2020 11:17

 


What does your dream kitchen look like? Colorful cabinets, farmhouse sink, island? Kitchen trends come and go, and we’re excited about what 2020 has in store for one of the most popular rooms in the house. Houzz recently released its 2020 Kitchen Trends Study; read on to learn more about what’s in and out for the coming year!

The Island Life

Islands continue to be popular fixtures in kitchen remodels. According to Houzz, half of all homeowners choose to add an island when renovating their kitchens, giving them added storage space, the opportunity for overhead lighting (both recessed and pendant), and a home for appliances like dishwashers and microwaves. L-shaped islands are most popular, coming in at 40 percent of all upgrades, followed by U-shaped at 30 percent.

Mixing Blues and Grays

Blue walls, hardwood floors and engineered quartz countertops are growing in popularity. But far more popular are white cabinets, which account for 45 percent of remodeled kitchens, Houzz reports. Two in five homeowners choose colorful island cabinets to complement the rest of the room, with gray and blue being the two most popular colors for island cabinetry.

Farmhouse Style Fades

Transitional and contemporary style kitchens account for 21 percent and 16 percent of upgrades, respectively. Farmhouse style has dropped to fourth place, with only 11 percent of remodelers opting for a rustic look. Neutral color palettes are still king, with many homeowners opting for gray, white and beige walls; hardwood and vinyl, wood-toned flooring; and stainless-steel appliances (why stop a good thing?). But risk-takers are adding a little personality to their kitchens with blue walls, beige floors and black appliances.

Upgraded Cabinets

Kitchen cabinets account for 94 percent of all kitchen upgrades, with Shaker-style reigning supreme. Though most people choose to completely replace old cabinetry, one in four homeowners opts for a partial upgrade, like refinishing or repainting existing cabinets. While they’re at it, many homeowners are putting in a full-wall backsplash from countertop to ceiling. Ceramic and porcelain continue to dominate for backsplash materials, with marble following in third.

Resources Drive Decisions

Spending on kitchen remodels continues to increase, with most homeowners reporting their primary reason for undertaking a remodel is that they finally have the means to do so. That said, remodels themselves are smaller in scope, with homeowners scaling back the breadth of their upgrades, according to Houzz, and opting against full gut-jobs. Instead, kitchens are being made more open with views to other rooms, with current layouts and sizes staying relatively the same.

Bestselling Kitchen Accents

Houzz reports that the top five categories for kitchen finishes are:


    • Kitchen faucets

    • Range hoods

    • Pendant lights

    • Kitchen sinks

    • Barstools

 

Whether you’re planning a full remodel or just sprucing up your space, we recommend keeping Houzz’s study in mind. The good news is that clean, classic looks with a touch of personality are in, which means your kitchen remodel is sure to stand the test of time.

How Interior Decor Will Change in 2020

by Chuck Roper 16. January 2020 12:17

 



December may be a time for reflection, but January is a time for looking forward. The new year brings new opportunities to reset, refresh and live our best lives. It’s also the best time to set goals and make the changes you’ve always thought about, whether that means hitting the gym more often or finally painting your home office.


Giving your home’s interior decor a facelift is an easily achievable goal for 2020, and we encourage you to take some time to learn how decor trends will change this year. If you haven’t yet, take a look at our list of the Top 10 Design Trends for 2020 and read on to hear how experts forecast how interior design will change in the coming year.

Sustainability and Eco-Friendly Practices


In a recent article in Vogue, fashion designer Stella McCartney wrote about how she is doing her part to make her world more sustainable, from turning the ponds at her home into an independent sewage system to paper-mâché walls made out of shredded office papers in her London flagship store. It is increasingly difficult to ignore the need to reduce, reuse and recycle in our everyday lives, and it’s easier than you think to incorporate eco-friendly decor into your design.


According to InteriorZine, many interior designers are expected to “create unusual and new materials based on recycling, alternative technologies and a well-balanced approach” between the two. Chief among these efforts is to reduce the use of plastic in design and instead use natural materials like seagrass, bamboo, and corn.

Modern Urban vs. Luxury Living


It should come as no surprise that city living typically means having less space to work with. In this day and age, as modern urban living continues to evolve, the new middle class is looking for a space that is in tune with their everyday needs. The world has gone digital, with increasing numbers of people working from home and using their spaces in ways their parents may not have. Gone are the days of formal dining rooms; in are sleek spaces that can serve multiple functions, from rest and relaxation to wining and dining. This has prompted a creative challenge for interior design professionals, who must design cost-effective spaces that can meet the needs of their clients.


Changes to Primary Living Spaces


There was once a day when kitchens, dining rooms, and living rooms were all compartmentalized—literally. But if you’ve ever seen a home renovation show, you know that primary living spaces that are open concept are #1 on everybody’s list. The design of these spaces is constantly evolving, with InteriorZine reporting that an integrated kitchen-dining room “is a ‘must’ for modern life’s dynamic,” whether you’re entertaining business associates or keeping an eye on your kids while you prepare dinner. In addition to being downright useful, integrated spaces make your home look larger and make it easier to incorporate design elements across the board.


“Living” Kitchens


On average, how much time would you say you spend cooking in your kitchen? Conversely, how often do you use it primarily as a socialization space? As family dynamics change, so too do the ways we use our homes’ spaces. Fluid living spaces are a must, and “living” kitchens provide a stylish, comfortable and functional space that works for your taste and lifestyle.

 

How many of these interior design elements do you think you can incorporate into your home in 2020? We challenge you to create a space that works for you—and the environment.

TextBox

Tag cloud